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Rowing

Rowing

The rivers sections of the inland waterways as well as one of the canals have attracted rowing clubs some of whom have enabled their members to enjoy the river amenity for over 100 years.

Many rowers begin through school clubs and continue through life, rowing for exercise and competitively! Others begin later in life and enjoy the experience of setting their own pace at which to enjoy river life.

The clubs in Ireland (the Shannon & Grand Canal) and Northern Ireland (Erne System and Lower Bann) are a great starting point and their contact details can be found in the listing section.

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Why not try Rowing on...

Lower Bann Navigation

Rowing is a lifelong sport that many begin in school. More people than ever are joining throughout t...

Erne System

Rowing is a lifelong sport that many begin in school and enjoy the huge health and social benefits t...

Rowing on the River Shannon

Shannon Navigation

Rowing is a lifelong sport that many begin in school. More people than ever are joining throughout t...

Grand Canal

Rowing is a lifelong sport that many begin in school. More people than ever are joining throughout t...

Barrow Navigation

Rowing is a lifelong sport that many begin in school. More people than ever are joining throughout t...

Select your waterway...

Barrow Navigation

​​​​​Winding its way through peaceful woods, fertile valleys and picturesque villages the Barrow is fully navigable for 68km from Athy to St. Mullins. A significant canalised waterway right up to the 1950’s the Barrow’s industrial past saw commercial barges carrying consignments of barley to the Guinness Brewery in Dublin and later, supplying beet to Ireland’s first sugar factory at Carlow.

Erne System

​The Erne System has its share of dramatic landscapes and historical treasures; the monastic round tower at Devenish Island rising up from the Lough, the ruined remains of Tully Castle, the picture postcard image of Enniskillen’s medieval castle on the edge of its island banks and the National Trust’s Castle Coole and Crom Estate all compete for your attention.

Grand Canal

​Built amid the 18th-century canal fever that swept across Ireland, the 144km Grand Canal stretches across the country from Dublin to the Shannon.

Lower Bann Navigation

​The Lower Bann is navigable from Lough Neagh to the sea at the Barmouth between Castlerock and Portstewart Strand.

Royal Canal

​The Royal Canal, on its 146km journey from the River Liffey in Dublin to the Shannon, passes 46 working locks, 10 of them double-chambered.

Shannon Erne Waterway

​Running between Leitrim Village and just north of Belturbet, the Shannon-Erne Waterway links the two great waterways on the island, the Erne System and the Shannon Navigation.

Shannon Navigation

​The Shannon is a treasure waiting to be discovered. The longest river in Ireland, the River Shannon and its lakes are a bustling, colourful navigation.​

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